BIO
Born and raised in Seattle, Washington, and after several years of life experience, I began prolifically and consistently producing work reflecting my unique style and conceptual aesthetic that people enjoy, engage with and want to live with. After a steady climb into the Seattle art scene, I’ve been invited to make work for locally high profile events, shown in many group and solo exhibitions from alternative spaces to the Seattle Art Museum Sales Gallery, attracted substantial press attention and a global online following, and have shown nationally, including a successful solo show at Cleveland’s Kenneth Paul Lesko Gallery. In December 2013, countless people enjoyed and engaged with my work at the inaugural show at Seattle Art Museum Gallery’s new location inside the museum, which was also their first ever solo artist show.

SEATTLE MAGAZINE 2011 SPOTLIGHT AWARD: TROY GUA - Profile by Bond Huberman

STATEMENT

Radio Edit:
I prolifically and consistently produce accessible and engaging pop-inflected conceptual work in a wide range of media, marrying commercial to contemporary with a glossy design aesthetic and a keen wit. My subject matter deals with iconography, identity, cultural critique, and the universal need for recognition.

Extended Remix:
I am a child of 1970's and 1980's America. I did Elvis impersonations for my parents' friends on the hearth. I dressed as Elton John for Halloween, complete with a custom-made satin jumpsuit. I saw every Star Wars movie on opening day. I cried with my big sister the day John Lennon died. I watched way too much TV.

I grew up with Ronald McDonald and Ronald Reagan, King Tut and the King of Pop; images and icons that have been burned into my subconscious. Rock stars, advertising, packaging, Hollywood, fast food, the internet, Facebook, and reality tv - American mass culture is shaping my life, and is a vital component of my creative process.

Encouraging closer investigation and often resin-coated and highly lustrous, my work is reflective, both literally and metaphorically. It implies the reflection of our mainstream culture, my fascination with it and my desire to become part of it. It suggests the slickly wrapped bits and bytes of information our modern world is continuously fed through our growing assemblage of media. It refers to what we choose to see and what we choose to show.